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October 26, 2020

Land dispute: District admin finally settles issues between rival tribes

Peshawar

October 26, 2020

MIRANSHAH: The joint efforts of deputy commissioner and district police officer of North Waziristan on Sunday yielded positive results as the rival tribes agreed to settle the land disputes through jirga to be constituted within three days.

People hailing from different tribes in Mir Ali tehsil of North Waziristan had blocked the Bannu-Miranshah road at several points in protest over land disputes.

The people of Khadi, Eidak, Norak and Azizkhel tribes in Mir Ali tehsil had erected barricades on the Bannu-Miranshah road at several points and blocked it for vehicular traffic in protest against the ongoing disputes on ownership of land in the area.

The protestors had placed big stones and trolleys at several points on Bannu-Miranshah road to suspend vehicular traffic. They also laid an iron chain on the main electricity transmission line and disconnected the power supply to the entire North Waziristan.

The police and district administration, who were making strenuous efforts to calm down the protestors, had failed to make any breakthrough due to the stiff stance by the rival tribes.

However, the deputy commissioner and district police officer of North Waziristan continued their efforts and finally succeeded to resolve the land disputes between the Borakhel and Eidak tribes through peaceful means.

It was decided that a jirga would be formed to settle the issues of disputed lands while the police were deployed in the area. The DC and DPO would personally monitor the situation so the unscrupulous elements could not exploit the issue. Also, the district administration in collaboration with the Tesco authorities restored the power supply to the district.

Land in the seven erstwhile Fata districts along the Pak-Afghan border is often owned collectively and lacks official records. This often leads to conflicting claims among tribes and clans.